NSF Funds AI Upgrade for Bridges

NSF Funds Artificial Intelligence Upgrade for Bridges

National Science Foundation Awards $1.8-Million for Upgrade to Expand Bridges’ “Deep Learning” Capabilities

Sept. 24, 2018

PSC’s Bridges supercomputer is being upgraded to provide the world’s most powerful AI servers to the national research community. The supplemental award of $1.8 million from the National Science Foundation funds acquisition of the resource, which features specialized graphics processing units (GPUs). “Bridges-DL’s” integration with the rest of Bridges and new staff positions will help researchers exploit the system’s full potential.

“PSC provides resources that let people go beyond ‘What can I do, given my local resources?’ to ‘How can I leverage data to make the next breakthrough?’” said Paola Buitrago, Director of Artificial Intelligence and Big Data at PSC and co-principal investigator for Bridges. “It’s breaking that barrier that unleashes creativity and accelerates discovery.”

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PSC Part of New NSF-Funded Cybersecurity Group

$4.9 Million Grant Will Protect U.S. Scientific Workflow

Aug. 29, 2018

PSC will be a collaborating institution in a $4.9-million cybersecurity award from the National Science Foundation. The grant will fund a new center focused on protecting and securing U.S. research, led by Indiana University. The PSC part of the new collaboration will be led by Jim Marsteller, PSC's Chief Information Security Officer.

The Research Security Operations Center, or ResearchSOC, is a virtual center led by IU and distributed across that institution and PSC, Duke University and University of California San Diego. ResearchSOC will help provide the research and education community with the cybersecurity services, training and information sharing necessary to make scientific computing resilient to cyberattacks.

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PSC’s Bridges Supercomputer Extended by NSF

National Science Foundation Awards $1.9 million for Extra Year of Operational Funding

Aug. 27, 2018

PSC’s groundbreaking Bridges supercomputer will provide value to the research community for an additional year, extending operations through November 2020, thanks to $1.9 million in added operational funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The new award, which will fund mostly staff positions, brings the total funding for Bridges to over $19 million. NSF awarded the original grant for Bridges to begin in December 2014.

Read more: PSC’s Bridges...

PSC-Led Conference Brings Experts and Students in Advanced Research Computing to Pittsburgh

July 30, 2018

The PEARC18 conference, held in Pittsburgh, Pa., closed on July 26 after five days of tutorials, plenary and contributed talks, workshops, panels, poster sessions and a visualization showcase.

The annual Practice and Experience in Advanced Research Computing (PEARC) conference—with the theme Seamless Creativity this year—stressed key objectives for those who manage, develop and use advanced research computing throughout the U.S. and the world.

“We are happy that our efforts resulted in a very strong technical program,” said Sergiu Sanielevici of the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center, General Chair of PEARC18. “Participants shared comments such as, ‘The tutorials this year were terrific-my staff and I will share with everyone when we get back to campus.’ and, ‘The papers were very high quality, I had a hard time choosing sessions, all were of high interest and important to my work.’”

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PSC Role in IceCube Cosmic-Ray Neutrino Detection

July 12, 2018

Four billion years ago, the incredible energy of a massive black hole at the center of a distant galaxy—a blazar—created a cosmic ray particle. As part of that process, it also formed a high-energy neutrino and a shower of gamma rays. In September, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica detected that neutrino. Combined with detections of gamma rays at collaborating institutions across the world, a series of IceCube neutrino detections provide solid evidence that cosmic rays derive from vast collapsed stars as they eat the material of their resident galaxies. The IceCube collaborators recognized these neutrinos for what they were thanks in part to a series of simulations they previously ran on the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center’s Bridges system.

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Listen to the WESA-FM radio interview.

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PSC Media Contacts

Media / Press Contact(s):

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Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center
chiacchi@psc.edu
412-268-5869

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Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center
benton@psc.edu
412.268.4960

Website Contact

Shandra Williams
Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center
shandraw@psc.edu
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